Thursday, January 28, 2010

Log Cabin Chocolates

I started a new part-time job this week all the way up in Bel Air (I live in Towson - yay, commute from hell). I passed a few times by Log Cabin Chocolates, a Fallston business that held the intriguing promise of homemade chocolates. But only today did I have the opportunity to stop in. I'm happy I did, because homemade chocolate does something for me that regular chocolate just, well, doesn't.

The big, wooden outside of the building belies the bright and friendly interior of the candy showroom, which opens on to what appears to be a gigantic chocolate-making workshop. The friendly little old lady behind the counter greeted me and asked what I would like. Sionce I can't make a decision to save my life, I had to just look around for a minute, and take it all in. The offerings were fairly typical of most homey candy shops: gummy candies, butter creams, nuts and sponges and brittles and truffles and all manner of things covered in milk and dark and white chocolate. Rheb's did indeed come to mind. The prices were fairly typical as well: a pound of assorted chocolates (your pick) was $15. Half a pound will only cost you $7.50. A quarter pound is half of that. I went for the middle and got the half-pound box.

The woman helped me in a most friendly way, reminding me constantly that there were more chocolates along the entire span of the display case. But I'm more of a buttercream fanatic, so I found myself lingering there. A few I got: vanilla, chocolate, maple and lemon buttercreams, peanut brittle, white chocolate-covered nuts, an orange jelly, and something called a "nougatine" which I had never heard of before. She may also have slightly undercharged me, as I technically ended up with about .53 lbs but still paid the 1/2 lb rate. Hey, it's just a few hundredths of a pound. I didn't need it gift-wrapped, but she tied a neat green bow around the box anyway - to keep it from falling apart in case I dropped it.

Of course, I couldn't wait the extra 40 minutes to get home, so I made quick work of that green ribbon and before I knew it one of the vanilla buttercreams was in my hand. Just the smell made me crazy (in a good way, of course). The taste was such a rich, chocolatey taste that I just don't experience from a Godiva or another big-name chocolatier. Of course, I went for the maple, then the orange jelly (such a luscious candy, that orange jelly), and before I knew it, I had eaten a good quarter of the box before I even made it into Baltimore County.

I had to hide them so I wouldn't eat the entire box. And I have to drive by there and back three times a week for the next 15 weeks! Ah, poor me. Poor me and my chocolate-lovin' waistline.

7 comments:

diningdish said...

My weakness is chocolate covered marzipan, raisins, turtles and caramel.....

To save money I buy rolos and put a couple grains of sea salt on each LOL

John said...

Rolos with sea salt? I must try that...

Jen said...

I drive past the Log Cabin store all the time because my parents live in Bel Air, but I've never been inside. Now that I know they have such good chocolates, I'll have to stop sometime soon. I'm in Bel Air now, maybe I'll even stop by on my way home!

Brad said...

I'm glad you posted this. I'm in Perry Hall and my in-laws live in Bel Air. We're always driving by this place but have never stopped in. Now I can't wait to!

Anonymous said...

As a child growing up in Rosedale, one of our neighbors at Easter time would buy this HUGE chocolate bunny then pull it all over the neighborhood in a little wagon for the kids to sample. What a treat! What a fond memory! I think this is where he got the rabbit. It was yummy.

Anonymous said...

I am glad you injoyed it my dad works there he is the only one that makes the candy and i bet he will be very glad to here that

Anonymous said...

they have a new website to purchase chocolates online...

www.logcabinchocolates.com

check it out!!